Health News

Diabetes Loves the Graveyard Shift
It can be exhausting to work an irregular schedule with both night and day shifts. An irregular schedule also may raise the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
Vitamin D for the Diabetic Heart
If you develop diabetes, you have to start taking even better care of your heart than before. Drinking a certain type of yogurt may be one way to protect against your increased risk of heart disease.
Hit the Bottle, Keep Diabetes at Bay
Eating lots of refined carbohydrates - which are found in foods like white bread and sugary drinks - can increase your risk of diabetes. Changing your diet may lower your risk, but a little alcohol might do the same.
Low-Cal, High-Gain for Diabetes Patients
Diabetes affects many parts of the body, including the heart. So, how should you protect the health of your heart if you have diabetes? The answer may lie in what you eat.
It Takes a Village
The neighborhood you call home shapes many aspects of your life. But does it affect your chances of becoming obese or developing diabetes? Researchers recently explored this question.
Diabetes Can't Handle Veggies
Here in the United States, we eat a lot of meat. We also have a huge public health problem with diabetes. While meat may not be responsible for the soaring rates of diabetes, not eating meat could prevent the disease.
Better Life Style Produces Healthier Women
Moving on up in life has its benefits, including better health. Where you live can reduce the odds of a mother developing diabetes or becoming obese - both conditions that can shorten a woman’s life.
The Low Down on Sugar-Free
Sugar-free products have taken over the nation showing up in beverages and foods. They have been thought to lower caloric intake and prevent dental caries. How much of this is really true?
Intervening in Obesity and Diabetes
With both obesity and diabetes on the rise, there is much need for treatment options that work. Exercise and healthy eating are among those options.
Less Life Free of Diabetes
Americans are living longer than ever before. But does this longer life expectancy mean that people are living healthier, or are they living longer through periods of sickness?