Health News

More Pain, More to Gain from New Joints
With the aging population of baby boomers, the number of joint replacement procedures is rising steadily. But the risks and benefits of surgery might not be the same for every patient.
Faces of Arthritis in May
There's osteoarthritis. And rheumatoid arthritis. And infectious arthritis, childhood arthritis, Still's disease, lupus, Sjogren's disease and many more. In total, there are more than 100 kinds of arthritis.
Time for New Arthritis Med?
Inflamed, swollen joints with firm tissue bumps under the skin can send patients to their doctors for treatment. But certain factors make patients change their medicines before long.
RA Treatments Go Head-to-Head
Biologic medications are a newer form of treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. They are often prescribed in combination with other medications. But how do they work when given alone? And which one works best on its own?
Kids Get New Rx for Rare Arthritis
Patients with rare diseases often lack a variety of treatment options. Fortunately, children living with a rare form of arthritis appear to have a new option.
The Drag Towards Rheumatoid Arthritis
Some women find it cool just to hold a cigarette. But smoking them could be tied to pain in those hands and in other joints later on.
RA is a Hard Job
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a painful disease that can interfere with many aspects of a person's life, and the workplace is no exception. While plenty of RA patients continue living productive lives, others find that their disease hinders their work and even their chances of finding work.
RA Patients Who Take a Spill
From pain and fatigue to joint damage, the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis can make it hard for patients to move around. These symptoms may even lead them to trip, stumble and tumble over.
Is Low T a Sign of RA Tomorrow?
Low testosterone can affect a man's life in many ways, from reduced sex drive to lack of energy. Now it seems low levels of this hormone may be related to joint disease.
Lifestyle Linked to RA
While the exact cause of rheumatoid arthritis remains unknown, scientists are getting a better idea of what puts people at risk for this painful disease. It seems lifestyle may have a lot to do with that risk.