Health News

Fatty Fish to Lower RA Risk
Even though the cause of rheumatoid arthritis remains unknown, researchers continue to find ways that could help people reduce their risk of this painful disease. A recent study found that a simple diet change might protect against the development of rheumatoid arthritis in women.
Avoiding Blood Clots with RA
Inflammation plays a central role in rheumatoid arthritis. That inflammation, or swelling, is what leads to joint damage and serious pain. Inflammation also plays a role in certain blood clotting disorders. So could rheumatoid arthritis patients be at risk of clotting disorders?
Starting RA Treatment Right
There are so many medications to treat rheumatoid arthritis that it can be hard to tell which one will work best. One group of experts is telling patients where they should start.
Pay More, Expect the Same
Rheumatoid arthritis can cause severe pain and stiff joints that make it hard for some patients to do their jobs. In fact, this disease is estimated to be responsible for a yearly cost of $11 billion due to work days lost.
The Kind of Arthritis Matters in Surgery
Arthritis is painful, no matter the cause. If hip surgery is needed, though, patients with one kind of arthritis could benefit longer down the line compared to patients with the other kind of arthritis.
Folks With RA May Tend to Avoid Booze
It’s hard to know why, but arthritis patients might be less likely to drink than people without arthritis. Researchers are unsure whether alcohol helped prevent arthritis or worsened symptoms.
The Weight on the Joints
When pain from arthritis hits the joints, it can be hard to deal with. Patients can get a better grip on their joint pain if they take control of their weight.
RA Combo Treatments After First Rx Fails
Methotrexate is often the first choice of medication to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). When methotrexate alone doesn't do the trick, patients may take a combination of other medications. So, what's a good combination?
RA: Early To Treat, Have Symptoms Beat
In the past, doctors started rheumatoid arthritis treatment with medications that mainly dealt with symptoms. Now, doctors start with medications that attack the disease itself, a tactic confirmed once again by a new study.
Skipping Out on Arthritis Meds
Some patients who worry about taking too much of a prescription medicine might not take their meds as prescribed, including arthritis patients. Not following the dose instructions has become a lot more common.