Health News

Living Near Highways May Raise High Blood Pressure Risk
Living close to a major roadway may have negative effects on health. One such negative effect is the possibility of developing high blood pressure, a condition that can lead to serious health problems like heart attack and stroke.
Some Women Lacked Heart Disease Awareness
Awareness of heart disease symptoms and risk factors can save lives. But a recent study showed that some women were lacking this vital knowledge.
Depression May Raise Risk for Heart Disease in Younger Women
Young women are more prone to depression than older women or men of any age. New research looked into whether depression was a sign of physical health problems.
Stroke Prevention Should Start Early in Life for Women
Stroke usually affects people later in life. However, new research suggests that it's not just older adults who should be careful.
Exercise May Be Best Heart Protection for Overweight Women
Exercise is key to losing weight and keeping that weight off, which is healthy for the heart. But even without weight loss, physical activity may provide quite a bit of benefit to the heart.
Women With Diabetes More Prone to Heart Disease Than Men
Men and women can be diagnosed with diabetes based off of the same signs and symptoms. But that doesn't mean that the condition affects both sexes equally.
Early Menopause Could Hurt Your Heart
Women typically go through menopause in their early 50s. Hitting menopause before this age might carry some serious risks to the heart.
Women Over 30 Should Stay Active for Their Hearts
Heart disease is the leading cause of death in women in high-income countries. It seems that the biggest risk factor for the condition may be a lifestyle habit that can be changed.
High Blood Pressure Can Seriously Affect Pregnancy
High blood pressure during pregnancy puts pressure on both the baby and the mom. At the moment, there has yet to be a consistent strategy for prenatal care in women with high blood pressure.
Calcium Didn't Lead to Heart Disease
Previous studies have suggested that taking calcium supplements leads to an increased risk of heart disease. However, that may not be the case.