Health News

COPD May Worsen with Allergies
Many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience episodes called exacerbations in which their symptoms get worse. New research suggests that allergies may add to these symptoms.
Mommy's Mouth: Super Pacifier Cleaner
You're out with your baby and the pacifier falls on the ground. You pop it in your mouth to "clean" it and give it back to your baby. Can that simple act affect your baby's future allergies?
Where the US Sidewalk Ends…
Americans are are no strangers to hay fever and other allergies. Yet Americans born outside of the US may have to deal with these conditions less than those born in the US.
A Spicy Dare Not Worth Taking
Truth or dare is an age-old game that will never wear out in childhood and adolescence. Often, the game involves harmless fun. But some dares should never be taken.
Biking the Distance Minus Nose Troubles
Saving on gas and keeping the body active are a couple of benefits to biking to school and work. But riding alongside motorized traffic comes with its risks.
Does Baby Formula Need Prebiotics?
Prevention of allergies in children is a murky science. Some parents may add prebiotic supplements to baby formula in the hopes that the prebiotics could reduce allergy risk.
Under the Tongue to Stop the Sneeze
People with asthma and allergies often have to take medication to stop their sneezing, itchy eyes and running noses. There’s new evidence to suggest an allergy treatment used in Europe could help prevent these reactions before they start.
Putting Milk on the Map
Researchers already knew that milk allergy was common among American children. But until recently, they weren’t sure how it compared to other food allergies.
Nuts on the Plane
Traveling with peanut and tree nut allergies can be challenging.  Airplane flights can be especially difficult since nuts are so often passed out as snacks. But allergies shouldn’t keep you grounded.
Different Country, Different Allergies
Children born outside of the United States have lower allergy rates than US-born children. But now researchers have found that foreign-born children's allergy risk changes the longer they live in the US.