Health News

Diet May Trump Glycemic Index
Lowering your risk for health problems like diabetes and heart disease through diet may be simpler than once thought. Patients may need to simply focus on eating healthy, natural foods in general, rather than worrying about how healthy foods affect factors like blood sugar.
Yoga May Cut Heart Disease Risk
Want to reduce your heart disease risk? Some sun salutations or warrior poses might help.
New Report Ranks US States for Healthiness
The United Health Foundation today released its annual state health rankings. The states varied widely, and some national measures of health saw slight improvements.
Weight Loss May Relieve Urinary Problems
If you've got metabolic syndrome, you may have a raised risk for urinary tract symptoms like bladder leakage, having to urinate more often, having to get up at night to go and feeling an urgent need to go. And you may be able to fight those symptoms by losing weight.
A Sweet Way to Lower Diabetes Risk
Chocolate lovers may have one more reason to indulge their sweet tooth — chocolate may lower diabetes risk.
Don't 'Bypass' Exercise After Weight Loss Surgery
Having weight loss surgery can improve obese patients' health, but it isn't a fix-all for health problems tied to being obese. Exercise may improve these patients' overall health even more and lower their risk for diabetes.
Yogurt May Help Prevent Diabetes
As the saying goes, an apple a day keeps the doctor away — but pairing that fruit with yogurt may keep diabetes away, too.
Coffee May Reduce Risk of Type 2 Diabetes
Coffee drinkers may have one more reason to brew another pot. Coffee might prevent type 2 diabetes, according to a research roundup published for World Diabetes Day.
Bariatric Surgery May Reduce Diabetes Risk
Surgery for weight loss is meant to help patients slim down. But new research suggests that it might also prevent type 2 diabetes in the process.
Low Vitamin D Not Tied to Diabetes Risk
Past studies have suggested that low vitamin D may be tied to an increased risk for type 2 diabetes. But new research challenges that notion.