Sexually Transmitted DiseaseInfo Center

Organs From High Risk Patients May Be Okay for Donation
People at risk for certain infectious diseases are usually disqualified from being blood donors. However, new research suggests that they may still be safe organ donors.
Using Fewer Clinics May Be Better for HIV Care
Reliable and consistent care for HIV-infected people is a necessity. Using multiple care centers for treatment may not allow patients to get the right amount or kind of care.
Hepatitis Cases Tied to Diet Supplement
Hepatitis, or inflammation of the liver, is often caused by infection with one of the hepatitis viruses. But reports are surfacing of a non-viral form of the disease with connections to a dietary supplement.
No Worries for the HPV Vaccine
One of the only vaccines that is known to prevent some forms of cancer is the HPV vaccine. Those who might worry about its safety have no reason to fear.
HPV Vaccine Wards Off Warts
Cervarix, the HPV vaccine used to help prevent infection with the human papillomavirus that can lead to cervical cancer, may have an unexpected benefit.
UNAIDS Releases HIV Progress Report
HIV/AIDS has affected millions of people around the world for the past few decades. And now it's in steady decline.
Startling Cancer Trends Among Young People
Cancer is generally a disease of an aging population. Cancer risks typically start to increase around the age of 50. But recent trends signal an alarming jump in a certain type of cancer among people under the age of 45.
How Does HIV Affect Menopause?
Recent advances in HIV treatment have allowed more HIV-infected women to live through and past menopause. But not much is known about the effects of HIV on menopause.
What Your Sexual Past May Mean in Pregnancy
Any time you visit a new doctor's office, you are generally asked to fill out your medical history. This information can be particularly important for OB/GYNs when you are pregnant.
Mystery Surrounds HPV Vaccination Patterns
Cervical cancer isn’t all that common in this country anymore. Virtually all of the cases that do develop arise because of the human papillomavirus (HPV). Two vaccines are available to attack the major cancer-causing strains of this virus. But not all young women get vaccinated.