Anxiety DisordersInfo Center

Dad, Don't Suck it Up
Mental illness often runs in families. Children are generally at a higher risk for a mental disorder if a parent has one. These patterns can show up very early in children's lives.
Less Social With Eating Disorders
Eating disorders often go hand-in-hand with anxiety and isolation. So much so, that helping people with eating disorders learn to enjoy social interaction could improve the illness.
Are You Angry – or Grateful?
Seeking strength from God to deal with illness is just as common as being angry at God for an illness. But the way these two attitudes affect an individual is quite different.
This Is Your Brain on Sleep Apnea
Sleep problems should be taken seriously because they can lead to so many other health conditions. But these disorders appear to act differently in women and in men.
When the "Ugly Duckling" is Overweight
Most are familiar with pop culture's stereotypes when it comes to bullying. "The fat kid" always gets made fun of by other kids. But bullying is no laughing matter. A recent study found that the majority of teenagers getting treatment for their weight had been bullied.
When Peanuts Become Weapons
"Hey little Johnny! Want some peaaaaanutttts ? They're goooooood for you! Here, touch them!" Sounds like standard child teasing, right? Unless Johnny has a serious peanut allergy.
Replaying Memories as Dementia Therapy?
Reminiscence therapy uses the good aspects of memory to help people feel better. A recent study wanted to know if this therapy could help dementia patients and their caregivers.
Cancer Coping with Mindful Art Therapy
The body and mind go hand-in-hand. Coping and managing stress are essential to beating disease and coming out on top. Mindful practices and artful expression may help.
Talk Therapy for Kids with PTSD
A severely traumatic event like sexual abuse or a natural disaster leaves its scars on children. They may go on to develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Dealing with the Loss of a Child
It is not surprising that a parent who loses their child is at a higher risk for depression and anxiety. But do their mental health risks depend on how their child died?