Health News

Too Late to Treatment for Many Young HIV Patients
HIV treatment can help patients manage their condition if it is started early. However, not everyone seeks out treatment early enough.
How HIV May Strike the Heart
By 2015, HIV patients are expected to be surviving to and past 50 years old. Therefore, these patients may need to be closely monitored for conditions tied to older age, such as heart disease.
New Rx Combo Was Effective Against Hepatitis C
Hepatitis C patients may soon have a much more effective and simple treatment. One recent study showed that combining two new medications was safe and reduced the amount of active virus in patients.
HIV Patients' Life Expectancy Can Be Normal
Advances in drug therapy for HIV are allowing HIV patients to live fuller and longer lives. It's possible that the average life expectancy of an HIV-positive person with treatment is approaching the life expectancy of uninfected people.
HIV May Cause Structural Heart Disease
Structural heart disease is very common in HIV patients. It's possible that the conditions are directly related.
Antivirals May Help Those With Diabetes and Hepatitis
Patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), which primarily affects the liver, face a higher chance of getting diabetes. Antiviral HCV medication, however, may improve diabetes outcomes.
Key Groups Not Knowledgeable About HPV Vaccine
If there was a vaccine that could possibly prevent cancer, everyone would get it — right? The answer is more complicated than that, as a new study focusing on HPV vaccination showed.
How Vaccines Have Changed Disease Rates
Sometimes it's easy to forget how common many diseases were before vaccines for them were introduced. When the disease is not around, people may not notice as much.
New HIV Guidelines Encourage Regular Health Check-Ups
New advancements in HIV treatment have allowed many people to live with a very small amount of the virus in their bodies. But what are the pros and cons?
Global Trends in Oral Cancers
It used to be that smoking and drinking alcohol were the biggest risk factors for cancers that develop in the mouth and throat. Those trends may be changing, according to a new study.