Serax

Serax is used to treat anxiety. Do not stop taking this medication abruptly or without talking to your doctor or pharmacist.

Serax Overview

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Serax is a prescription medication used to treat anxiety, including symptoms of anxiety caused by alcohol withdrawal.

Serax belongs to a group of drugs called benzodiazepines. These work by slowing activity in the brain, which allows for relaxation.

This medication comes in capsule form and is taken 3 to 4 times a day. It may be taken with or without food.

Common side effects of Serax include tiredness, weakness, dry mouth, and upset stomach.

Serax can also cause blurred vision, drowsiness, and dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Serax affects you.

The brand name product Serax is no longer available in the United States. Generic alternatives are available.

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  • Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium
  • Anxiety Disorders
  • Epilepsies, Partial

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Serax Cautionary Labels

precautionsprecautionsprecautionsprecautions

Uses of Serax

Serax is a prescription medication used to treat anxiety, including symptoms of anxiety caused by alcohol withdrawal. Serax has been used to treat symptoms of anxiety related to depression, as well as irritable bowel syndrome.

Serax is not indicated for use in psychoses.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Manufacturer

Serax Drug Class

Serax is part of the drug class:

Side Effects of Serax

Serious side effects have been reported with Serax. See the “Serax Precautions” section.

Common side effects of Serax include the following:

  • drowsiness
  • tiredness
  • weakness
  • dry mouth
  • diarrhea
  • upset stomach
  • changes in appetite
  • restlessness or excitement
  • constipation
  • difficulty urinating
  • frequent urination
  • blurred vision
  • changes in sex drive or ability

This is not a complete list of Serax side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Serax Interactions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • antihistamines such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
  • digoxin (Lanoxin)
  • levodopa (Larodopa, Sinemet)
  • medication for depression, seizures, Parkinson's disease, pain, asthma, colds, or allergies
  • muscle relaxants
  • oral contraceptives
  • phenytoin (Dilantin)
  • probenecid (Benemid)
  • rifampin (Rifadine)
  • sedatives
  • sleeping pills
  • theophylline (Theo-Dur)
  • tranquilizers

This is not a complete list of Serax drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Serax Precautions

Serious side effects have been reported with Serax including the following:

  • Low blood pressure (hypotension). Serax should be used cautiously in patients who have cardiac complications that could be worsened by low blood pressure. Elderly patients are especially vulnerable to changes in blood pressure.
  • Dependence. Benzodiazepines, such as Serax, may cause physical and psychological dependence. Patients should not change the dose or abruptly stop taking Serax without talking to their healthcare provider.
  • Rare but serious side effects of Serax include the following:
    • shuffling walk
    • persistent, fine tremor or inability to sit still
    • fever
    • difficulty breathing or swallowing
    • severe skin rash
    • yellowing of the skin or eyes
    • irregular heartbeat

Serax can also cause blurred vision, drowsiness, and dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Serax affects you.

Do not take Serax if you are allergic to Serax or to any of its ingredients.

Serax Food Interactions

Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of Serax, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving this medication.

Inform MD

Before taking Serax, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions. Especially tell your doctor if you:

  • are allergic to Serax or to any of its ingredients
  • have glaucoma
  • have or have had seizures
  • have liver disease
  • have heart disease
  • have lung disease
  • if you smoke or drink alcohol
  • are pregnant or breastfeeding

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Serax and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

An increased risk of congenital malformations associated with the use of benzodiazepines during the first trimester of pregnancy has been suggested in several studies. Serax, a benzodiazepine derivative, has not been studied adequately to determine whether it, too, may be associated with an increased risk of fetal abnormality. Because use of these drugs is rarely a matter of urgency, their use during this period should almost always be avoided. The possibility that a woman of childbearing potential may be pregnant at the time of starting therapy should be considered. Patients should be advised that if they become pregnant during therapy or intend to become pregnant, they should communicate with their physician about discontinuing the drug.

Serax and Lactation

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

It is not known if Serax crosses into human milk. Because many medications can cross into human milk and because of the possibility for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants with use of this medication, a choice should be made whether to stop nursing or stop the use of this medication. Your doctor and you will decide if the benefits outweigh the risk of using Serax.

Serax Usage

Take Serax exactly as prescribed.

Serax comes in capsule form and is taken 3 or 4 times a day. It can be taken with or without food.

The effectiveness of long-term use (greater than 4 months) of Serax has not been established. Your physician should periodically reassess the usefulness of this drug for your condition.

If you miss a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the regular time. Do not take 2 doses of Serax at the same time.

Serax Dosage

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully.

The dose your doctor recommends may be based on the following:

  • the condition being treated
  • other medical conditions you have
  • other medications you are taking
  • how you respond to this medication

Because of the flexibility of this product and the range of conditions responsive to it, dosage should be individualized for maximum beneficial effects.

Typical dosages of Serax range from 10 to 30 mg 3 to 4 times daily.

Serax Overdose

If you take too much Serax, call your healthcare provider or local Poison Control Center or seek emergency medical attention right away.

If Serax is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting, it is unlikely that an overdose will occur. However, if overdose is suspected, seek emergency medical attention.

Other Requirements

  • Store Serax at room temperature. Protect from exposure to moisture and light.
  • Keep this and all medicines out of the reach of children.