Health News

One Brisk Step at a Time
Brisk walking is a good aerobic activity for anyone. It's now known to be particularly healthful for newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients.
Younger Men Benefit From Surgery
New research has suggested that older men diagnosed with prostate cancer may not need any treatment. Now, a 15-year study shows that surgery is the best option for men under the age of 65.
Dietary Fats and Prostate Health
You can't turn around without hearing praise for the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids. Likewise, trans-fatty acids are considered one of the most unhealthful substances we can eat. Well, hold your horses - when it comes to prostate health, all that's wrong!
Some Prostate Cancers Don't Need to be Treated
Men aged 65 and older who are diagnosed with a low-risk form of prostate cancer don't need to jump right into treatment. Delaying surgery and radiation doesn't pose added risk of death as long as the cancer is closely monitored.
New Test Detects Prostate Cancer More Accurately
A large clinical trial has demonstrated a new screening for prostate cancer that's more accurate than the tests currently available. In research conducted by Northwestern Medicine, the new PSA test reduced the number of false positives and pinpointed prostate cancer more precisely, particularly the aggressive form of the disease.
Paternal Cancer May Influence Congenital Birth Abnormalities
A new study finds offspring from male cancer survivors face a slight increase in major congenital birth abnormalities compared to offspring from fathers with no history of cancer.
Equal Protection
A study funded by HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine maker, Merck & Co., finds the HPV vaccine GardasilĀ® protects boys as well as girls against the virus.
Certain Prostate Cancer Tumors More Likely to Metastasize
Certain prostate tumors have the potential to become metastatic if not treated aggressively, according to new research from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
New Therapy May Halt Prostate Cancer
A new RNA therapy has been shown to prevent prostate-cancer stem cells from replicating, thanks to new research from University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
The Little Gene that Could
The protein known as SIRT1 -- known for its life-spanning effects -- has been shown to inhibit prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), which often prefigures prostate cancer.