Health News

Experts Say Outdoor Air Pollution Causes Cancer
Not long ago, scientists declared that diesel fumes were cancer-causing and linked to lung cancer. An international body has now gone a step further in classifying outdoor air pollution.
Colorectal Cancer: A Family Matter
For most people, colonoscopy screening for colorectal cancer should begin at age 50. If everything looks good, the next colonoscopy happens 10 years later. For folks with a family history of the disease, earlier and more frequent screenings are recommended. But even that may not be enough.
Going Online with Anti-Cancer Behaviors
The Internet is an increasingly popular source for health and wellness information. And while being online offers a rich and ongoing supply of information, researchers wanted to know if the Internet helped change behaviors.
Cancer Screening Harms Some Doctors Aren’t Talking About
While detecting cancer early is essential to beating the disease, some screenings can overdiagnose — that is, they might pick up cancers that won’t ever be a problem, which can lead to unnecessary treatment.
Sunscreen Delivered on Cancer Curbing Promises
For years now, we’ve been told to wear sunscreen to protect our skin from the sun’s harmful rays. Sunscreen keeps you from getting sunburned. But does sunscreen really protect against skin cancer?
No Worries for the HPV Vaccine
One of the only vaccines that is known to prevent some forms of cancer is the HPV vaccine. Those who might worry about its safety have no reason to fear.
Soaking in the Sun's Deadly Rays
Wear sunscreen, stay in the shade, avoid sun during the hottest part of the day: most people know the golden rules of keeping skin healthy and free from cancer. For people who have previously had melanoma, those rules are especially important.
Primary Care Doctor Visits Save Lives
Research has shown that screening cuts the incidence of colorectal cancer. And folks who visit their doctors regularly are more likely to learn about and be referred for colorectal cancer screening. Do these two facts save lives?
Cancer Preventive Rx Too Risky for Most
Women who are at high risk of developing breast cancer may be prescribed risk-reducing medications. Because some of these medicines have serious side effects, recommendations regarding who should take them have changed.
FDA Approves First Generic Capecitabine to Treat Colorectal and Breast Cancers
The US Food and Drug Administration today approved the first generic version of Xeloda (capecitabine), an oral chemotherapy pill used to treat cancer of the colon or rectum (colorectal cancer) that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic), and metastatic breast cancer.