Health News

Baby DIY
A new study by researchers from the United Kingdom reveals that a practice called baby-led weaning can result in nutritional complications for a small number of babies.
Don't Sugarcoat It
Sugary drinks and foods may increase risk of heart disease in adulthood, according to a news study from Emory University.
The Worst Kind of Hand-Me-Down
A new study has found that the children of parents who smoke face an increased risk of hypertension in childhood, which can lead to cardiovascular problems as adults.
Making Connections
The brain consists of a complex web of connections. In order for people to integrate and synthesize information from various parts of the brain, brain cells create long-distance links between one another.
What the Kids Are Talking About
A new study by Ratib Lekhal the Norwegian Institute of Public Health examines the relationship between the type of child care that children receive and the development of their language skills.
The Magic of Mother's Milk
A recent study published in the Journal of Nutrition shows that adolescents who were breastfed as babies exhibit a healthier physical condition than those who were not breastfed.
A Healthy Baby New Year
For most women, finding out they are pregnant is a joyous occasion, full of hope and happiness. But along with that happiness can also be stress and worry, hoping that the baby growing inside of them will be delivered healthy and without complications. There are many questions to answer and much information to gather...what vitamins to take? What should she eat? Should she continue to take her prescribed medication? To help answer these questions for all expectant mothers and women thinking about having a baby, the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) wants everyone to kno...
Shocking News!
Congenital defects and certain cancers are caused by malfunctioning stem cells, even before birth.
Prematurely Deciding Preterm Infants' Health
Frequently, late-preterm infants (born between 34 and 37 weeks of gestation) receive the same treatment as full-term infants. However, new research shows that treating late-preterm babies as though they are developmentally mature can be damaging to their health.